Sewing: Captain Scarlet Breeches

Normally I knock out a pair of trousers in about two hours, but these blighters kept me going for days: in part because I kept running out of concentration… points… whatever it is that limits your ability to think without finding yourself just repeating the lyrics to “Hooked on a Feeling” or sewing over your own fingers several times; in part because it turns out thick wool is hard to sew through. Happily, there was only one instance of the machine needle snapping and flying at my face this time, which is an improvement on the canvas shorts.

Photograph taken in the bedroom for added mess to crop out.
Photograph taken in the bedroom for added mess to crop out.

Fabric: end of roll wine-coloured Melton wool from the glorious wonderland of Walthamstow’s fabric shops.
Cuff fastenings: four wooden toggles and some ribbon, from the glorious republic of haberdashery that is The Cloth Shop in Wood Green market.
Zips in the pockets: because why the hell not.
Pattern: adapted from the same old, same old 1930s/40s women’s trouser pattern. The only part of the pattern I use is the front-and-back templates with darts, the cuffs and waistband are my own and the decision to cut off the pattern at just below the knee is both fabric-saving and sensible considering how often I wear knee-high boots.

Toggles magnificently hidden for some reason.
Toggles magnificently hidden for some reason.

Buttons: cut from a pair of old button-fastening socks I bought from Top Shop many years ago and which were beyond their last legs. Waste not, etc.
Interfacing: HA HA HA WHO BOTHERS USING THAT I am a terrible seamstress.

I am either ahead of my time or very much behind it but I do enjoy a semi-Tudor silhouette.
I am either ahead of my time or very much behind it but I do enjoy a semi-Tudor silhouette.

A slightly better view of the toggles. I’m hoping these are going to be toasty and comfortable this winter, and validate the fact that overall they cost me about £18 to make. For a pair of wool trousers, though, I suppose that’s not all that bad, especially given the perfect fit and the colour.

Next: A test run for a coat pattern I’ve cobbled together, but in cheapo cotton so that screwing it up isn’t a painful waste of money!

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